Best White Granite Countertops: Types, Pros & Cons, and Maintenance Tips

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Granite is among the most popular materials used in countertops because not only is it durable but also adds elegance and value to your home. White granite countertops in particular help brighten up any space which makes them the go-to option for many homeowners.

But with the many variations you can choose from, which is the right color for you? Here are the best white granite countertops for kitchens and bathrooms to help you decide. We’ve also included the pros and cons of white granite along with a few maintenance tips.

Types of White Granite Countertops for Kitchens and Bathrooms

First of all, take note that pure white granite doesn’t exist. So if we say white granite countertops, we are referring to granite with a predominantly white or off-white background with colored flecks and striations. These variations make granite slabs unique and add character to your countertop surface.

So, here is our list of white granite countertop color variations that can complement any kitchen color or material you want:

1. Alaska White

Alaska White granite slabs are quarried and imported from Brazil and usually have a blend of warm and cool colors from neutral to dark grey, black, and brown specks. More attractive variations have a luminous white background of frosty whites and icy silver mixed with deep onyx and rich cocoa hues which resemble the remarkable Alaskan landscape.

The hues are evenly distributed throughout the slab and have moderate color, tone, and granularity variations which creates an aesthetically pleasing contrast and pattern. If you want a more contemporary granite countertop that suits both light and dark cabinets, Alaska White granite would be a great option.

2. White Ice

Another versatile white granite from Brazil, White Ice has an icy sheen with dark gray and deep ocean blue veins that create a chic addition to a cool-toned kitchen or bathroom. The veins can also range from brown to reddish hues depending on the slab.

Stainless steel, metallic, and gray appliances would be the best choices to perfectly match the unique color of White Ice granite.

3. New River White

New River White granite is quarried in India and consists of a picturesque alabaster bedrock with crimson speckles and rich silver veins. It looks like marble and can appear gray from afar and in dim rooms but looks cream-colored when exposed to bright lighting.

The most unique feature of this granite slab is its riverlike pattern demonstrated by its long, thick veins that provide an appealing contrast with darker cabinets.

You might also want to take a look at Carisma Brushed and White Cloud granite slabs if you want wavier water-like patterns.

4. Bianco Romano

Imported from Brazil, Bianco Romano has icy-cool colors that would look fantastic under fluorescent lights and produces a pearly look. It’s mostly white with grey, beige, and/or cream veining that resembles natural icebergs. The small burgundy and black flecks (some with quartz deposits) on the slab give it its unique character.

Bianco Romano granite is also called Tropical White, Pashmina, Novo Branco Romano, Blanco Romano, and White Romano among other names.

5. Delicatus White

Delicatus Montana granite is another stone from Brazil that is also referred to as Romano Delicatus, Juparana Delicauts, Delicatus Hiperion, or Kodiak. It consists of dark-colored veins that are usually light gray, dark black, or caramel.

This granite has a combination of many colors and crystals which gives the stone its dramatic appearance. Some slabs even contain golden, peach, or deep blue (less common) speckles and white quartz deposits to add a classy look to your countertop.

Another option you might want to consider if you want a granite countertop with more uniform but thinner black veins would be White Lady:

6. Salinas White

Salinas White is quarried in Brazil and has a snowy white or bone-white backdrop featuring dense packs of onyx speckles that offer a luxurious feel to any setting. It also has smoky tan and light pewter accents that create less contrast compared to other granite slabs.

Decorators love Salinas White for its soft shimmer and its ability to work remarkably well with traditional settings including dark woodwork.

Another granite stone worth considering with somewhat similar patterns is Spring Breeze:

7. Moon White

This is another stone quarried in India that has exquisite bright ivory swirls as well as silver gray and jet black speckles. It also has dark ruby garnets or burgundy and clear quartz specs that complete the intricate design of the stone. Some can also have subtle yellow undertones but all Moon White granites have relatively uniform colors as opposed to other white granite variations.

This white granite is also known as Kashmir Pear, Emerald White, Lunar White, Morning Mist, or Moonlight granite. It is best paired with white cabinets, stainless steel appliances, and white backsplashes (subway tiles would be great).

8. Colonial White

Colonial White granite is from India and is designed for homeowners who want warmer hues. Among its defining features are its dark rose flecks and its creamy off-white backdrop that is almost yellow under specific lighting. The stone has small dark specks in black, brown, and/or gray along with smoky silver tones that fit perfectly with the slab’s warm aesthetic.

The granules are scattered uniformly throughout the stone which creates an elegant and refined look. This makes Colonial White perfect for white cabinets but you can also go for darker ones for a more dramatic feel. Other names for this stone are Indian Blanco, New Imperial, Platinum White, Buckingham White, and White Colonial.

9. Andino White

Andito White granite came from Brazil and consists of white and gray shades with charcoal and beige accents. It has a uniform look with some slabs featuring large white specks while others offer a more muted appearance. Either way, this stone offers a highly desirable pattern that is perfect in modern kitchens.

Andino White would look great with natural oak if you want a traditional aesthetic but you can also pair it with stainless steel appliances and espresso cabinets.

10. Bella White

Bella White granite can have a creamy white or light gray undertone with patches of gray, black, and white mineral deposits. The mineral deposits can be abundant or nearly non-existent with slight differences in their frequency. The patterns in the stone will look different depending on the lighting.

The gray and black mineral deposits will blend more in darker lighting which will make the stone appear uniform but with a darker look. But with lots of natural lighting, the white patches will be more pronounced and will make the stone appear brighter.

11. Smoky White

Smokey White offers medium movements in its patterns with fairly consistent small white, black, and gray crystal speckles that form appealing color waves. This makes it perfect for contemporary countertops. It has a mainly white background and uniform patches compared to other white granite which makes it ideal for those who prefer consistency.

12. White Torroncino

Another Brazilian stone, White or Bianco Torroncino granite offers an upscale look with fantastic color combinations to make your home feel calm and peaceful. It has a dramatic beige, gold, burgundy, black, gray, and/or brown speckles along with unique veining and high variations that make it great for commercial spaces.

Torroncino granite slabs are often embedded with brownish-gray lines that flow like a river which distinguishes them from other white granite colors.

13. Blizzard White

Blizzard granite is a blend of a soft white backdrop with dramatic gray veining that will work great with a more urban-style look home. Quarried in Brazil, the stone also features scattered black and gray minerals. Its unique look makes it ideal not only for countertops but also for fireplaces and entryways.

Are you having a hard time deciding which white granite color to choose? You can visit the A1 Stone World slab year near Jacksonville, FL to see a wide variety of countertops options.

Pros and Cons of White Granite Countertops

White granite countertops are known for their sophisticated beauty and ability to complement any style. However, maintaining them can be more challenging compared to other colors and countertop materials. Let us show you why through their pros and cons below:

Pros

Visual Appeal

No two white granite slabs look the same which makes them unique. And while there are really no all white granite countertops, their beauty lies in their variations and flecks that add warmth and character to your kitchen or bathroom.

Durability and Stain Resistance

Granite is among the hardest stones that can’t be easily cut or scraped. Also, white granite conceals blemishes and imperfections better than dark-colored countertops especially if it has colorful flecks and intricate veining.

In addition, it can resist staining by preventing liquids from permeating into the stone when properly sealed.

Illusion of Space

The clean and bright color of white granite can make any room appear lighter and bigger. It also reflects light better which creates the illusion of space without boundaries. This makes it ideal for small kitchens to make them look more spacious.

Versatility

The one-of-a-kind pattern of white granite showcased by its multi-colored flecks and striking veins can complement a wide range of colors and materials. So whether you are into subtle or high-contrast designs, white countertops can give you the stylish look you’re looking for.

Adds Home Resale Value

White granite countertops are popular and can increase your home’s value by up to 25%. They also sell faster so you can make a good profit if you are planning to sell your home in the future. You can find ways on how to maximize granite ROI here.

Cons

Expensive

Just like other granite countertops, white granite is expensive and is even comparable to the price of some marble and quartz countertops. And since it is a heavy stone, installation and labor costs will also be more expensive.

Uniformity

Since granite slabs are natural stones with unique patterns, it’s hard to achieve uniformity which can be an issue if you are a perfectionist. Also, their heavy weight makes them harder to install and you will need strong cabinets that can support your countertop’s weight.

Requires Regular Sealing

Like other natural stones, you need to seal granite regularly to prevent etching, bacterial growth, and stains. Take note that you also need to seal white granite, along with other light-colored variations, more often and it is harder to seal compared to other granite types.

Visible Stains

White granite countertops do hide blemishes and imperfections better, but stains will be more visible. And although it can resist most stains, it will require more maintenance compared to other colors of granite.

White Granite Countertops Maintenance Tips

Lastly, here are a few maintenance tips you can follow to keep your white granite countertop looking new for the years to come:

  • Use trivets and hot pads. Granite does well in handling heat, but repeated exposure will weaken its sealants.
  • Use chopping boards when using sharp kitchen tools. Never cut directly on your countertop.
  • Clean your countertop regularly by washing it with hot water. We don’t recommend soapy water as it can leave a white residue on the sealant.
  • Only use granite-specific cleaners that are pH-neutral for deeper cleaning.
  • Don’t use harsh chemicals and abrasive cleansers like bleaches, ammonia, vinegar, lemon, and household cleaners especially if your countertop is not sealed. These cleaners can damage and dull the surface.
  • Don’t use abrasive cleaning tools like a scrubbing brush or a scourer to avoid scratching the surface.
  • Wipe up spills immediately to avoid staining. Make sure to blot up the spill first to prevent it from spreading and developing etch marks. In addition, here are ways to remove white granite countertop stains you can follow.
  • Seal your granite countertop upon installation (if it’s unsealed) and reseal at least once a year depending on the granite’s porosity and the sealer quality. Sealing your granite countertop properly is crucial to increasing the longevity of your countertop.

FAQ

Is white granite more expensive?

White granites tend to be more expensive compared to black and tan granite slabs because they are less abundant and harder to find.

Does white granite turn yellow?

Yes, your white granite countertop can turn yellow due to the following possible reasons:

Your countertop contains iron that can rust or oxidize when exposed to water and chemicals such as bleach.

Most granites are resined and the resin might be tinted or can turn yellow over time when exposed to UV rays.

Is white granite out of style?

No. In fact, white granite is currently in high demand along with black granite because of its minimalist appearance. They are timeless options that won’t limit your color choices when designing your kitchen.

Final Thoughts

White granite countertops are popular choices that give you excellent durability while offering a chic look for your kitchen or bathroom that won’t go out of style. They provide a clean aesthetic that can match a wide array of colors and materials which gives you more design flexibility.

See our product gallery to explore your options A1 Stone World or you can reach out to us and we’ll be more than happy to assist you and can setup an appointment to show you our indoor slab yard!

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